INSIDE PUBLIC ACCESS
NEWS AND ANALYSIS OF: PUBLISHERS — LIBRARIES — AUTHORS
CHORUS — SHARE — CONGRESS — FEDERAL AGENCIES — AND MORE!


Wednesday, May 25, 2016

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Welcome to Inside Public Access, where experts and insiders track the US Public Access program. The US Government has embarked on a massive new public access program to make the scholarly literature that flows from over a hundred billion dollars a year in federally funded research publicly available. How this massive new program will play out, especially who will win and who will lose, remains to be seen.

Inside Public Access is here to provide ongoing news and analysis to those with a need to know about the emerging US public access program. Subscribe now at the rate of less than ten dollars a week for a one year subscription to our weekly newsletter.

Our inside reporting is led by Dr. David Wojick, who has been tracking the US public access program from the beginning. Also on board is Dr. Walter Warnick, who recently retired as Director of the US Energy Department's Office of Scientific and Technical information, where he led DOE's Public Access program.

The US Public Access initiative is a response to the so-called Open Access (OA) political movement. The basic OA idea is that the subscription based scientific journals are a bad idea, even though this is the standard form of scientific communication. The OA goal is that people who do not have a subscription should still have access to the scientific literature. The OA movement seeks government intervention to achieve its goals and the US Government has responded, initiating what it calls the US Public Access program.

The US Public Access program kicked off in February 2013 when the President's US Office of Scientific and Technology Policy (OSTP) issued a memo calling on all Federal agencies that fund scientific research to make the journal articles that flowed from that funding publicly available. Each funding agency is developing its own plans for public access.

The situation is far from simple because the US Public Access program is complex and each of the many Federal funding agencies is relatively free to do what it likes. Thus the newsletter Inside Public Access was born. Our goal is to track and analyze what the various Federal agencies are doing in response to the OSTP mandate. Collectively these agencies fund over a hundred billion dollars worth of research each year, so what they do regarding public access is significant. The future of the OA movement may well depend on what the US Government decides to do.

SAMPLE HEADLINES:
VoR versus AM, who calls the shots?
SHARE may not be useful to Public Access
CHORUS goes global
Congress asserts Public Access oversight
FIRST moves, fight to follow
Public Access raises copyright questions
Minimalist access at NSF?
For more information contact David Wojick
davidwojick@insidepublicaccess.com
(540) 358-1080
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